True Champion Dog Questions and Answers

 Welcome to our Q and A post!

dog supplements and nutrition information
The best way to give the formula to your dog is to mix it in there dog food sprinkled on top once or twice a day.
Our dog supplement formulas are free of fillers and anything artificial, we don’t add any flavor enhancers because they are known to cause all kinds of issues. The best way to give it to picky eaters is mix it in a scoop of plain regular yogurt and give it to your dog. This solves the problem 99 percent of the time.
Thanks for asking that question, it’s our favorite. The kind of muscle YOUR DOG WILL GAIN WILL BE LEAN DENSE MUSCLE MASS WITH MUSCLE DEFINITION this is how the formula is designed. We believe in increasing lean healthy muscle that will stay even if you stop use of our product, which will contribute to overall health of your dogs. That is why the muscle gained is dense and lean, not bulky or fat.
The reason it works is quality human-grade ingredients in the correct ratios, for dogs that workout, this can include going for regular walks to weighted vest exercises. Every company tells consumers that their products are the best, so why do very few work? The reason is simple, quality ingredients and research, it’s that simple. There are thousands of manufacturers of ingredients but the quality of each manufacturer is different to varying degrees. This is what makes the difference between what works and what doesn’t work. When you use super high quality ingredients, the results you get are superior. It’s not easy to concoct a dog supplement with proper ratios of nutrients that actually absorb. Remember quality products produce results, period. Cheaper, bad quality products don’t, period.
Our formalizations would help in terms of strengthening his muscles so that as he gets older he will maintain better muscle function. It will help reduce chances of muscle atrophy, which is what dogs suffer from a lot of these days as they age. Commercial Dog Food, no matter how high quality, usually isn’t enough to prevent this age related issue. Extra support is needed.
The simple reason why your dog is not maintaining healthy weight is because all dog foods are made with cooked meat, the reason is to avoid bacteria and food poisoning in your dog. The problem with this is that it kills the natural enzymes and the protein digestibility in your dog. Unlike people, dogs were never meant to eat cooked meat. The solution is simple add raw meat to your dogs kibble, canned food doesn’t count, plus it’s a lot more expensive then raw meat. We suggest not to completely pull your dog off of kibble because there will be days when you may not have the time to feed them raw meat. The last thing you want is a dog that only eats raw meat because it becomes very time consuming feeding your dog raw only. The breeder blaming the dogs genetics is not the real issue here and shouldn’t be a reason to get another dog. I’m sure you love your dog and refuse to replace him as you should never replace your dog just because he can’t gain weight. Just add raw meat and BuffK-9’s True Champ formula and see what happens. Also a weighted vest will speed up the process of natural muscle building. Remember you can work your dog out hard but without the proper nutrition he will not grow properly and won’t maintain healthy weight. To increase healthy muscle weight requires extra nutrients such as raw meat with a quality muscle building supplement such as BuffK-9’s True Champion Dog formula. Any person who tells you that genetics and dog food is all you need may not be completely educated on the subject.


It’s completely safe to give to your dog BuffK-9 True Champion Dog year round for ANY DOG; especially if he works out regularly because the formula protects and prevents muscle atrophy and really helps them with longevity. Just compare a person who works out, eats healthy and adds supplements to their diet on a daily basis. Their muscle tone, skin and joints are in better health compared to a person who drinks a lot, eats fast food and does not have any supplements added to their diet.
NO. There are no ingredients contained in any of our formulas that would increase aggression. True Champion Dog Supplement can increase energy and drive, however.
Our flagship formula improves lean muscle mass which helps maintain mobility. As dogs age, they lose their range of mobility. Its important to pay close attention to the mobility of your dogs’ muscles, which is also factor that’s overlooked often.
10. What kind of raw meat do you recommend?
Raw ground beef with 10 to 20  percent fat is great or raw ground chicken is also great. Give your dog raw meat at least 3 or 4 times a week, make sure to always mix it with a high quality dry dog food kibble of your choice. Never use raw meat by itself because it doesn’t contain all the necessary nutrients your dog needs. That why you always mix it with dry dog food kibble. To take it to the next level of health add BuffK-9’s True Champion Dog formula and watch the results.

Best Dog Food

What’s the Best Dog Food for my Dog?


We receive many inquiries from our customers about what the best dog food would be to feed their dogs. To address this question is not easy. We have to take into account that some dogs are sensitive to chicken, while others are sensitive to beef. Some dogs cannot digest corn while some dogs have no problem with it.

The real problem with finding the best dog food is quality! Quality becomes a major factor in determining the best dog food to feed your pet. Many dog owners know what the “Four D’s” of dog food are: Dead, Diseased, Disabled or Dying. These types of meat products are regularly added to our dog’s diet without us ever thinking about it. To give a graphic example, imagine finding a dead rotting animal in the middle of the road. Heating this dead animal up to a temperature to kill off bacteria, then feeding it to your dog. This is the concept of many mainstream commercial dog foods. It is simply disgusting. Do dog enthusiasts actually believe that their dog’s receive proper nutritional support from this type of dog food?

buff-k9-veterinarian-recommended-dog supplements best dog food



















The sad answer is yes. Many people think that simply feeding their dog the processed, dog food is enough to keep their dog healthy. This is a lie that has circulated many dog forums and dog health information sites for too long. Well then what type of food is the best dog food to feed?

In my opinion and experience as a nutritionist, no commercially processed dog food is acceptable when you really analyze the ingredients. Ask yourself this question, is eating McDonald’s cheeseburgers everyday an acceptable diet to you? No offense to those that do eat cheeseburgers everyday, but it is not acceptable to maintain optimal health.

Finally, what do I recommend for the absolute best dog food? The best dog food is the raw dog food diet. Dogs have been in existence today by eating RAW meat in the wild like their relative, the wolf. Feed your dog RAW food with a super high quality supplement like True Champion Dog and watch the benefits within 30 days. You won’t believe the transformation and health benefits.


Stay tuned for a follow up article on RAW dog food recipes….

RAW Dog Food, Dog Weight Gain Supplements

Dog Weight Gain Tips from an Actual Customer

All of us have had this problem at one time or another with our dogs but may have not noticed it.  Problems with dog weight gain, no matter how much dog food you feed your dog they don’t gain healthy muscle weight. This is what used to happen to my dog and it took a very long time figuring it out and thousands of dollars later we finally found the answer and the problem was the choice of dog food and choosing the right supplement to for dog weight gainer, muscle weight. My dog Jack is a pitbull who I purchased from a reputable breeder who is known for producing massive dogs. When I got my dog you could tell he was going to be a massive thick muscular pitbull just by looking at his frame but as he grew it seemed that his potential had vanished. I took him to the vet and they ran several tests to determine why he wasn’t gaining weight correctly and the results came back that everything was functioning correctly in his body and he was perfectly healthy. The vet assumed he wasn’t being fed enough. That was not the case I would feed him as much as he wanted so I started looking at other potential problems such as worms. I had been regularly de-worming him as needed but still wouldn’t help with my dogs weight gain problem. I had tried 90 percent of the different quality dog foods on the market with no success.


raw dog food dog weight gain buffk9When I finally broke down and was willing to try anything I talked to a friend whose dog looked like Arnold Schwarzenegger and his recommendation was simple he said feed him a reasonably priced quality dog food, some RAW meat and give him BuffK-9 True Champion Dog formula and you will see what happens in 4 weeks. I thought sure buddy your advice will not work because I was so disappointed from all dog foods and dog supplements for dog weight gain I had tried for my dog in the past that failed miserably. Something told me to just try the combo he recommended so I did, and holy Jesus is all I have to say, after a whole year and half of searching for a solution to my dogs not gaining healthy muscle weight I had finally found the combo. Quality dog food, RAW meat and BuffK-9 True Champion Dog, thank god companies like these actually do exist. I hope other companies can learn and also start producing real quality products instead of lying to consumers. Well I hope this helps everyone out who has the same problem with their dogs. Rest assured if you try this combo it will work, guaranteed.




Jack Sr.

Pitbull owner


dog vitamins for pitbulls true champion buff k9buffendurancenewbest dog joint supplements




Vitamins for Pitbulls

Vitamins For Pitbulls

How to choose vitamins for pitbulls

With all the choices flooding the market for vitamins for pitbulls, bullys’ and bulldogs how can a responsible dog owner make an informed decision? Well we have complied a list of criteria that will help owners of bully breed dogs choose the right dog supplements or vitamins for pitbulls. 

vitamins for pitbulls dog supplements 1. Is your dog supplement human-grade?

2. Where is your dog vitamin supplement produced? USA?

3. Does the company post real photos of dogs or photoshopped cartoon dogs?

4. Do the photos belong to the company or affiliates?

5. Is the supplement really balanced with protein, good fats, vitamins and minerals?

6. What form does the dog supplement come in, powder, pills or liquid?

7. Who designed the supplements? Vets, nutritionists, and qualified persons?

8. Is the supplement for adding bulk or high quality muscle?

For question one, if you have answers to this question, you will be able to narrow your choices down significantly. Most dog supplements are not human-grade with the exception of maybe 2-3 on the market so far. Question two, narrows down the market to maybe approximately 1-2 supplements on the market. Questions 3-7 continue to guide you in the right direction of quality. Finally, question 8, this is personal choice. Some owners looking for vitamins for pitbulls may want to simply “bulk” their dogs up by any means necessary. There are supplements designed for bulking as well as recipes to home-made products such as “satin balls.” 

For dog enthusiasts looking to add quality muscle, improve overall health and quality of life, the answer if clear. BuffK-9® True Champion Dog Supplement (suitable for ALL DOGS) fulfills all the criteria of an elite dog supplement or vitamins for pitbulls. BuffK-9® Supplements are known for producing quality supplements that produce results. True Champion Dog supplement incorporates human-grade ingredients to combine protein, amino acids, vitamins, minerals, omega fatty acids and herbs. This formulation not only helps to boost health but also lean muscle, skin/coat appearance and joint health. LEARN MORE

dog vitamins for pitbulls true champion buff k9







Article submitted by Jarrod Myers. Pictures by BuffK-9®

Weight Pulling Dogs

Weight Pulling Dogs, Supplements and Vitamins

In the competitive world of dog sports including weight pulling dogs, we know that our customers are always looking for that edge to beat out the competition. A lot of folks are under the assumption or misled that diet and exercise are the only factors involved in improving your dogs. That is only half the truth. Find out how BuffK-9® Dog Supplements can help your dogs gain muscle, strength, endurance, stamina, and recovery that will push your dog to the top of his or her game on top of diet and exercise.
Want exclusive discounts and sale offers? Sign up today


Why does your weight pulling dog need our supplements?

BuffK-9® Original black label

  • Add lean functional muscle
  • Improve strength
  • Improve recovery time
  • Add raw power and force 




BuffK-9® Endurance & Stamina Booster

  • Improve Endurance & Stamina
  • Increase oxygen circulation
  • Increase nitric oxide production
  • Improve physical output
  • Support heart health



BuffK-9® all natural dog supplements are beneficial for all working dogs, weight pulling dogs, sporting dogs, pitbulls, bull mastiffs, rottweilers, german shepherds, american bulldogs, hunting dogs, lure coursing dogs, or any type of performance dogs.

buffjointnew horseperformancesupplement


Agility Dog Training And Pit Bull Terriers

Agility Dog Training for your Pitbulls

Spending time training your Pit Bull can be very rewarding and fun for you both. It helps build a stronger bond between dog and owner that is important for the happiness of both parties. There are many different types of training that you can choose to do with your Pit Bull, one such is agility dog training.

Agility dog training is the process of teaching your dog to successfully navigate an obstacle course. If the training is successful, your pet should be able to do it by only listening to and obeying your commands. During an event, the dogs are timed and to win must not make any mistakes and must have the fastest time. It takes a lot of practice for a dog to be successful at this, but can be quite fun for both dog and trainer. This activity is especially good for Pit Bulls because it gives them a good outlet for all the extra energy they seem to have.

agility dog training supplements supplies

Most experts recommend not starting agility training until your dog is at least one year old, at least not to enter in a competition before that age. Many owners who train their dogs to participate in these events will purchase their own equipment to have at home, so that they can begin training the dog at an earlier age. Agility dog training equipment can be quite expensive, so some trainers prefer to build their own equipment. Instructions can be found online and in books that should be available either in your local library or bookstore. Owners should be careful to watch the dog for any signs of injury, because occasionally working on agility training while the puppy is still growing will put a lot of strain on joints and bones that are not fully conditioned yet. It is recommended to have your dog cleared by a veterinarian before beginning any type of agility dog training.

The dog should also understand and obey basic commands before beginning any other type of training. Any type of training helps dog and owner to build a better relationship with each other, allowing them to work better and better together as time goes on. You should also work through any behavior or aggression issues your Pit Bull may have before considering agility training. The results will be less satisfactory and take longer to achieve if the dog is also working through other issues.

Most Pit Bull owners that are serious about their dog competing in agility competitions will enroll him in a training class, at least to help teach him the basics, then work with the dog on their own to enhance what he has learned. Being in a class will also help your dog work on his socialization, which will make him behave better around other dogs. Pit Bulls tend to want to fight when around other dogs, especially those of the same gender.

The most important thing to remember is no matter what type of training you do with your Pit Bull, you both should enjoy it. Spending time together will help build a better bond, leading to a lasting relationship. Whether you want your dog to compete or not, the benefits for both you and the dog are many.

Agility Builds Confidence in Your Dog

Is your dog timid around people or other dogs?  Is your dog sensitive to sounds?  Agility training can provide the environment and structure to build confidence in your dog.  Agility classes are a great place for people to learn about the sport and learn how to train, but the timid dog may take a long time before he is ready to venture from under your chair or off your lap.

A timid or shy dog can only learn inside their comfort zone.  So, training must begin where they feel safe and behaviors must be taught in very small increments. Home will probably be the best place to train and have learning take place for your dog.

So, how do you train at home?  You will need guidelines and equipment. There is a multitude of websites that can give you information on agility training.  There are also books and videos that will give details and visual aids and lesson plans for beginners thru expert levels.


There is a variety of equipment that is useful and helpful to have at home.  Equipment recommendations are based on your available space and location of training.  Do you have a large yard that will hold 10 obstacles? Do you have a small yard where you will need setup equipment and then tear down before you can setup again?  Will you be training in your garage or basement, or as some agility addicts, in your living room.

For the timid dogs make sure your equipment is safe and sturdy.  The pause table is a good place to begin your agility training.   A 12” high pause table, with adjustable legs for later use, is a good starting place for all size dogs. Remember with your shy dog, setup your table in an area that is very familiar to your dog.  If your dog barks at anything new, just leave your pause table in your house or yard for several days, let your dog inspect and smell it on his own or with a little coaxing, but don’t push to fast, remember baby steps with the insecure dog.   With treats in a dish or his favorite toy placed on the table encourage your dog to get up on the table.  This may take more than one lesson, be patient.  If your timid dog looses interest in food or toys when you attempt something new, trying holding him and you sit on the table.  If your dog is too big to hold, have him on leash and you sit on the table.  If he backs away coax him, only treat or reward him when he comes to you, never when he’s pulling back away from you or the table.

Eventually, you want your dog to be able to jump on the table with your cue word, “Table”, “Box”, “Kennel”, whatever word you use, Stay on the table as you back away and then Come when you call. Build your distance slowly so that your dog is not pushed to soon.

From Pause Table to Contact Trainer is a nice transition for shy dog.  A Contact Trainer comes in different designs.  We recommend a 3-Piece Contact Trainer that has one mini A-frame side, a Pause Table, and then a mini Dog-walk side.  Your dog can Sit on the table and then be coaxed down the A-frame side or the Dog-walk side.  Just remember with the shy dog, training is done in increments, slowly and comfortably, with a little push to stretch him, but not enough to overwhelm him to cause a shutdown.

You can follow the above techniques introducing new obstacles as your dog is able to succeed.  As your dog succeeds on each new piece of equipment you will see his confidence grow.

Aggression When Another Dog Invades Her Space

Dear Adam,

Hi, I have a 3 year-old Australian Cattle Dog. She is a wonderfully obedient dog, canine good citizen certified and everything. She is very obedient and good natured to people, however she is very dominant when it comes to other dogs. Recently I have been having problems with her snapping at other dogs if they come up to her while she is on a leash. This is not a problem if I tell her to sit and the other dog stays a normal distance away. She doesn’t like dogs invading her space and standing over her (she is only 35 pounds, so most dogs tower over her). I call it her “Napoleon Complex”. I tried to work on the problem by putting a muzzle on her and setting up situations so I can correct her, but she realizes that she is in no position to show the other dog who is boss while muzzled and refrains. We have recently started therapy dog training classes, which she is doing very well in.

dog joints

Like I said she is a perfect angel around people. In a therapy situation she is unlikely to encourage other dogs on or off leash who will be allowed to be in a position close enough to upset her, however, if some instance did occur, I would feel uncomfortable with her snapping at another dog. In most instances, I can prevent a situation where she would be tempted to snap from occurring, however, there are some instances that can’t be avoided. Do you have any suggestions? I’m debating whether I should discontinue her therapy dog classes.

Thank You,

Dear Katie,

This is really more of a handler sigue. It’s your responsibility to NOT LET other dogs invade her space. Now, you can correct her for the aggression – but at the same time, you must show her that she can trust you, and that you will not let strange dogs from another pack wonder up and get in her face. This is the job of the pack leader – to protect the pack. And you’re not doing your job by letting strangers off the street walk up and get too close. I would recommend a walking stick or a stun gun.

As for the therapy dog training – I would recommend that you continue, but without seeing the dog in person, this will ultimately be a judgement call which you must make for yourself and your dog.

That’s all for now, folks!

Advice To Using Positive Reinforcement And Rewards To Train Your Dog

Training dogs using positive reinforcement and reward training has long been recognized as both highly effective for the owner and a positive experience for the dog.  Positive reinforcement training is so important that it is the only method used to train dangerous animals like lions and tigers for work in circuses and in the movie and television industry.

Proponents of positive reinforcement swear by the effectiveness of their techniques, and it is true that the vast majority of dogs respond well to these training methods.

One reason that positive reinforcement training is so effective is that is uses rewards to teach the dog what is expected of it.  When the dog performs the desired behavior, he is provided with a reward, most often in the form of a food treat, but it could be a scratch behind the ears, a rub under the chin or a pat on the head as well.  The important thing is that the dog is rewarded consistently for doing the right thing.

Reward training has become increasingly popular in recent years, but chances are some sort of reward training between humans and dogs has been going on for hundreds if not thousands of years.

When understanding what makes reward training so effective, some knowledge of the history of humans and dogs is very helpful.  The earliest dogs were probably wolf pups that were tamed and used by early humans for protection from predators, as alarm systems and later for guarding and herding livestock.

It is possible that the wolf pups that made the best companions were the most easily trained, or it is possible that these early dogs were orphaned or abandoned wolf pups.  Whatever their origin, there is little doubt today that the vast variety of dogs we see today have their origin in the humble wolf.

Wolf packs, like packs of wild dogs, operate on a strict pack hierarchy. Since wolf and dog packs hunt as a group, this type of hierarchy, and the cooperation it brings, is essential to the survival of the species.  Every dog in the pack knows his or her place in the pack, and except in the event of death or injury, the hierarchy, once established, rarely changes.


Every dog, therefore, is hard wired by nature to look to the pack leader for guidance.  The basis of all good dog training, including reward based training, is for the handler to set him or herself up as the pack leader.  The pack leader is more than just the dominant dog, or the one who tells all the subordinates what to do.  More importantly, the pack leader provides leadership and protection, and his or her leadership is vital to the success and survival of the pack.

It is important for the dog to see itself as part of a pack, to recognize the human as the leader of that pack, and to respect his or her authority.  Some dogs are much easier to dominate than others.  If you watch a group of puppies playing for a little while, you will quickly recognize the dominant and submissive personalities.

A dog with a more submissive personality will generally be easier to train using positive reinforcement, since he or she will not want to challenge the handler for leadership.  Even dominant dogs, however, respond very well to positive reinforcement.  There are, in fact, few dogs that do not respond well to positive reinforcement, also known as reward training.

Positive reinforcement is also the best way to retrain a dog that has behavior problems, especially one that has been abused in the past. Getting the respect and trust of an abused dog can be very difficult, and positive reinforcement is better than any other training method at creating this important bond.

No matter what type of dog you are working with, chances are it can be helped with positive reinforcement training methods. Based training methods on respect and trust, rather than on intimidation and fear, is the best way to get the most from any dog.

Advice On Adopting A Pitbull

A Readers Advice on Adopting a Pitbull


Dear Adam:

I purchased your book about 5 months ago, and I was hoping that might would “entitle” me to some advice. First, let me say that I’m very satisfied with my purchase. Not only does it give advice on specific techniques, but, more importantly, it explains the foundation of all training–timing, motivation, consistency–allowing the dog owner to better understand the training process. Also, it does a very good job of explaining that dogs are pack animals–and will test the alpha’s leadership at various times (in my case, all the time)–and how that factors into training. Finally, I like your common sense approach, e.g., “stay” is a double command, if the dog’s not supposed to break a sit or down without the release command, why do we need to tell it to stay.

My question is not about dog training, however, but about breeds of dogs. Specifically, APBTs [American Pit Bull Terriers] and AmStaffs [American Staffordshire Terriers]. The AKC does not recognize the APBT as a breed, however, many dog fanciers recognize the two as separate breeds even though they share a common origin and look very similar. Or, if not separate breeds, two “strains” of the same breed, the AmStaff being bred for “show” and the APBT being bred for “performance” – meaning the gameness of the original dogs has largely been bred out of AmStaffs, but still remains in APBTs. I’d like to hear your take on this subject since you own and have owned APBTs or mixes thereof.


The reason I ask is that I’m considering getting an AmStaff or a Staff Bull Terrier. My wife and I currently own a Dalmatian, however, so I’m a bit concerned about the two getting along, especially when I’m not around. Should I stay away from these breeds? I’ve had one breeder tell me they should be fine if the Staff is introduced as a puppy, while another told me never to leave them together alone. What would be your recommendation (I realize all dogs are individuals and may possess different traits than others of the same breed)?

Ryan Fehlig

Dear Ryan:

Thanks for the kind words. You’ve asked an excellent question!

I love the bull breeds, personally. Looking for advice on adopting a pitbull. And while everything you’ve stated is pretty much “right on the money,” … I would suggest that if you decide to adopt one of these breeds you make sure that:

1. The dog you’re adopting is the opposite sex of the dog you already own.

2. If the new dog is a male, then neuter him before he hits sexual maturity. (Before 1 year of age.)

3. If the other dog is a male, then definitely neuter him. (Although this will not be a “cure-all” it may help somewhat.)

It’s true… many of the dogs in this breed seem to have a genetic basis for dog aggression. I don’t think that they come out of the womb being dog aggressive, but rather that they have temperament characteristics that tend to make them more dog aggressive. (i.e., dominance and a strong defensive nature).

As for the difference between the APBT and the AmStaff, the difference is largely one of registration. (AKC vs. UKC). And yes, the AKC version has been bred with more of an emphasis on conformation (like all AKC breeds).

If I were to adopt another bull breed, it would likely be the Staffordshire Bull Terrier (the smallest of the “pit bull” breeds). I like the idea of having a big dog in a small package. But to be honest, I’m really tired of the media stigma that this breed has received. And in real life terms, this means having a dog that you can never really take off leash at a park – not because the dog is dangerous or untrained – but rather because people are so darn afraid of what the media has led them to believe about this breed, that they snatch up their children and run screaming from the park.

On the upside, this stigma can work in your favor, too. Most criminals know that a “pit bull” is the type of dog that you don’t want living in the house that you’re about to rob.

On a personal note, there was a character who let his Rottweiler run off leash at the park I used to train at. This dog had a bad attitude and was a very dominant-aggressive dog. The owner was under the impression that his dog was trained. He’d give multiple commands, such as, ‘Ranger come, come, come, come,’… but all Ranger would do is engage my clients’ dogs and try to initiate a dog fight.

Well, after I adopted Forbes (an APBT-mix that looks like one big muscle and is about as wide as a Mack truck) and started keeping him in a down-stay while I worked with my clients’ dogs… Ranger’s owner suddenly started keeping their dog on a much shorter leash. If he didn’t attach his dog to a leash as soon as he saw me enter the park, then he’d definitely run to grab his dog THE VERY INSTANT that he saw that Ranger wasn’t going to immediately turn and come when called.

I guess that’s what you call motivation, eh?

Yes… it’s probably a macho thing. But IF there is a stigma, then you might as well use it to your advantage to encourage reckless dog owners with untrained dogs to keep their mutts on-leash.

That’s all for now, folks!